Lilium canadense

(lil' ee-um ca-na-dense')

Common name: Meadow Lily, Canada Lily, Wild Yellow Lily

Family: Liliaceae, Lily

Height x width: 2-5' x 1'

Growth rate: moderate

Foliage: lanceolate to 6" long in whorls of 4-10, veins beneath with prickles

Flowers: one to several (16-20 at most) nodding trumpet-shaped lily flowers, each long stalked, from yellow to red-orange with dark spots, near top of stem, early to mid summer

Hardiness: zones 3-9

Soil: moist

Light: sun

Pests and Problems: none serious

Landscape habit, uses: natural gardens, borders growing up amongst other perennials

Other interest: native to eastern North America; species from fact it is often found growing in southern Canada; Native Americans ate flower buds and roots

Other culture: easy, sturdy and generally doesn't require staking

Propagation: division of bulbils off mother bulb or scales, seeds

Related Species:

Michigan Lily, L. michiganense, is similar only with sepals and petals recurving backwards until they touch the flower tube.

Cultivars:

Another American native which has become popular in the U.K., with several cultivars available there but seldom found in the U.S.

 


©Authored by Dr. Leonard Perry, Professor, University of Vermont as part of PSS123 course, fall 1997.

 Return to lecture plants list.

Notes/pictures: