Phlox divaricata 

(flox dii-vair-i-cah' tah)

Common name: Wild Blue Phlox, Wild Sweet William, Woodland Phlox

Family: Polemoniaceae, Phlox

Height x width: 12-15" x 12"

Growth rate: moderate

Foliage: opposite, sessile, ovate to lanceolate, 2" long and ½-¾" wide, viscid-pubescent stems and leaves

Flowers: blue, convolute (twirled) buds, symmetrical flowers of 5 petals united to form a trumpet-shaped corolla tube; petals notched at tips in east and not in west; spring; slightly fragrant

Hardiness: 4-7

Soil: moist, organic

Light: part to full shade, will tolerate sun in North if sufficient moisture

Pests and Problems: powdery mildew if hot and humid, also feeding from small mammals

Landscape habit, uses: shade, natural or woodland gardens, front of northern borders

Other interest: native to the eastern U.S.

Other culture: leaves drop and plants become partly dormant in dry, sun or heat

Propagation: spring division, summer tip cuttings, seeds

Related Species:

P. stolonifera, Creeping Phlox, is also native to eastern woodlands from Pennsylvania and Ohio southwards, with several commercially ornamental cultivars.
 
 

Cultivars:
 
Cultivar flowers other
'Clouds of Perfume' pale blue fragrant
'Dirigo Ice' icy blue 8-12"
'Fuller's White' white 8-12"
var. laphamii dark blue 18"
var. laphamii 'Chattahoochee' lavender blue dark center, long bloom
'London Grove Blue' deep blue fragrant
'Louisiana' purple blue magenta eye
     


©Authored by Dr. Leonard Perry, Professor, University of Vermont as part of PSS123 course.

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